Located on top of the Chukung glacier between Ama Dablam and Lhotse Mountains, Island Peak (or officially named Imja Tse) is the most sought after trekking destination because of its challenging geographical conditions. It is officially a spur, or ridge extension coming off part of Lhotse, the fourth highest mountain on earth (the other three being Everest, K2 and Kangchenjunga). It was named in 1951 as it appears to look like an island in a sea of ice when viewed from Dingboche, a popular trekking stop en route to Everest Base Camp. It was first climbed by a British team as a preparation for the first successful Everest trip that same year. Tenzing Norgay was part of the team.

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Each year more than 300 groups attempt to scale the summit of Island peak. This trek offers an excellent opportunity to climb Island Peak together with an exhilarating Trek to the Everest Base Camp and Kala Pattar. The most difficult section is a mixed rock and ice wall at a slope of around 45 degrees leading to the narrow summit ridge. Island Peak is perhaps the best (and only) opportunity for advanced beginner/intermediate climbers to take on challenging glacier climb above 6,000m in the heart of the Everest Himalayas.
It is no surprise that Himalayan peaks have drawn adventurers, climbers and cultural enthusiasts for nearly 200 years. The stark and rugged terrain, so entwined with the culture of local Sherpa people, offers such powerful experiences that Himalayan travel stands in a class by itself. While many think of travel to the Himalayas as only high altitude climbing or trekking, this is somewhat of a misconception as many beautiful ascents can be made with limited climbing experience. This expedition offers both climbers and trekkers an exciting opportunity to enter the world of the mighty Himalayas.